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How Does Invisalign Move Teeth?

Invisalign is a popular choice for orthodontic treatment, but have you ever wondered how it works to move teeth?


Unlike traditional metal braces, Invisalign is nearly invisible, and it applies force to the teeth in a unique way. In this article, we will explore the mechanics of Invisalign and how it moves teeth.

To start, it is important to note that all orthodontic treatments utilise force to move teeth. Braces use wires and brackets to apply individual force to teeth, while elastics can pull the jaw into alignment. Invisalign, on the other hand, applies force as a whole to the teeth. Each tray is modified to move different teeth and apply pressure in different areas, with each tray moving teeth by just 1/10 of a millimeter.

To understand how Invisalign moves teeth, we must delve into the world of physics. Specifically, Newton's Third Law of Physics applies to Invisalign. This law explains how osteoclastic and osteoblastic activity allows Invisalign to move teeth. Osteoclastic activity breaks down bone to allow teeth to move, while osteoblastic activity fills the gap left behind by the moving tooth.


This process takes time, with osteoclastic activity taking 48-72 hours to fully begin and only 4 hours to stop. This highlights the importance of wearing retainers for at least 22 hours a day to prevent prolonging treatment.

In summary, Invisalign is a popular and effective alternative to traditional metal braces, and it applies force to teeth in a unique way. Each tray is modified to move different teeth and applies pressure in different areas, with each tray moving teeth by just 1/10 of a millimeter. Invisalign utilizes Newton's Third Law of Physics to move teeth through osteoclastic and osteoblastic activity, which takes time and highlights the importance of wearing retainers as instructed.

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